President Joe Biden plans to visit Atlanta on Thursday, marking his 100th day in office.

It will be the second time Biden travels to Georgia since taking office in January, following his win over former President Donald Trump in Georgia’s 2020 presidential election by 11,779 votes.

Biden’s visit comes as his administration pushes a $2.3 trillion infrastructure package and continues overseeing distribution of COVID-19 vaccines.

The president will be joined by First Lady Jill Biden.

Georgia has taken center stage in national politics over the past several months as Democrats competed for and won both of the state’s U.S. Senate seats, handing Democrats control of Congress and the White House until at least the 2022 midterm elections.

The state remained a political lightning rod after Republican state lawmakers passed and Gov. Brian Kemp signed controversial changes to Georgia’s mail-in and early voting laws late last month.

Biden called the state Republican-led voting changes “Jim Crow in the 21st century,” echoing Democrats’ efforts to paint the measures as acts of voter suppression targeting minority voters. Republicans argue the law changes are needed to bolster confidence in the state’s election system.

Democratic leaders including Georgia U.S. Sens. Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff are now pushing national legislation on elections that aims to curb some impacts from Georgia’s recently enacted voting law changes.

Biden’s prior visit to Atlanta March 19 alongside Vice President Kamala Harris came days after mass shootings at three spas in the Atlanta area left eight people dead including six Asian American women. The killings sparked nationwide calls for solidarity with the Asian American and Pacific Islanders community.

During that visit, Biden mourned the shooting victims and touted a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package that Congress had passed shortly before the president’s Atlanta tour.

The president also during that visit hailed Georgia as a key battleground state that paved the way for passage of the new pandemic relief bill due to Warnock’s and Ossoff’s election. He urged supporters to oppose the Republican-led elections bill, which at the time had not yet passed in the General Assembly.

“We’re in a fight again,” Biden said in March. “It’s a fight we need because if anyone ever doubted that voting matters, Georgia just proved it did. … If anyone ever wondered whether voting can change a country, Georgia just proved it can.”

Biden previously visited Georgia several times ahead of last year’s general election in November and the Senate runoffs in January.